Nationality FIRST CLASS SECOND CLASS THIRD CLASS Total

Tot Survived Died %Survived Tot Survived Died %Survived Tot Survived Died %Survived Tot Survived Died %Survived

American 212 141 71 67% 51 24 27 47% 43 12 21 28% 306 177 119 58%

Austria-Hungarian 1 0 1 0% 4 1 3 25% 44 7 37 16% 49 8 41 16%

Belgian 1 1 0 100% 1 0 1 0% 22 5 17 23% 24 6 18 25%

British 45 20 25 44% 169 70 99 41% 120 19 101 16% 334 109 225 33%

Bulgarian 33 0 33 0% 33 0 33 0%

Canadian 27 13 14 48% 2 1 1 50% 5 0 5 0% 34 14 20 41%

Chinese 8 6 2 75% 8 6 2 75%

Danish 3 0 3 0% 7 1 6 14% 10 1 9 10%

Dutch 1 0 1 0% 1 0 1 0%

Finn 4 2 2 50% 55 17 38 31% 59 19 40 32%

French 12 11 1 92% 14 7 7 50% 5 0 5 0% 31 18 13 58%

German 3 3 0 100% 3 0 3 0% 4 1 3 25% 10 4 6 40%

Greek 4 0 4 0% 4 0 4 0%

Italian 2 1 1 50% 4 2 2 50% 4 1 3 25% 10 4 6 40%

Irish 3 0 3 0% 4 1 3 25% 113 41 72 36% 120 42 78 35%

Japanese 1 1 0 100% 1 1 0 100%

Mexican 1 0 1 0% 1 0 1 0%

Norwegian 1 0 1 0% 25 8 17 32% 26 8 18 31%

Portugese 1 0 1 0% 3 0 3 0% 4 0 4 0%

Russian 9 3 6 33% 18 6 12 33% 27 9 18 33%

Spanish 3 2 1 67% 4 4 0 100% 0 7 6 1 86%

Swede 3 2 1 67% 6 2 4 33% 104 23 81 22% 113 27 86 24%

Swiss 6 6 0 100% 1 1 0 100% 4 0 4 0% 11 7 4 64%

Syrian 2 1 1 50% 79 31 48 39% 81 32 49 40%

Turk 1 1 0 100% 8 2 6 25% 9 3 6 33%

Uruguayan 3 0 3 0% 3 0 3 0%

Total 324 201 123 62% 283 120 163 42% 708 180 518 25% 1315 501 804 38%

From John R. Henderson of Ithaca College

As to Nationalities he notes:
1. Most official lists provide no breakdown by nationality beyond British and Non-British.
2. The numbers used above are adapted from a list of country of origin created by researcher Hermann Soldner.
3. Because of changing geographic borders in a century's time and a different geopolitical understanding, plus mistakes made in 1912, the figures are not precise or accurate. For example, although there is a designation for Finland, some Finns were counted among the Swedes. Peter Björkfors, in his Finns on the Titanic article, produces a different total than the list above. There were two Australians, but Australia was not considered to be a separate country. Many from Austria-Hungary, were neither Austrian nor Hungarian but ethnic Eastern Europeans. Turkey and Syria were both part of the Ottoman Empire, and most Middle Easterners, however they were listed, researchers indicate, were Lebanese Christians.


RESOURCES FOR TABULATING STATISTICS


Because of the nature of record keeping at the time, here is no entirely accurate source for Titanic statistics. I highly praise and recommend Michael Findlay and Philip Hind for their monumental efforts in compiling information, but some errors, mysteries, and inconsistencies related to any list of names can never be resolved.
1. My main source for compiling passenger statistics has been Titanic Passenger List, 10 April 1912, by Michael Findlay. Mr. Findlay is probably the world's leading authority, having spent years of much research tracking down individuals from around the world to produce his list. It can be found in two print sources that I know of. It is an appendix found in Titanic: Women and Children First, by Judith B. Geller (Norton, 1998) and Titanic: Triumph and Tragedy by John P. Eaton & Charles A. Haas (Patrick Stephens, 1994).
2. I have also extensively used Philip Hind's Encyclopedia Titanica, beginning when it was called R.M.S. Titanic: Her Passengers and Crew. Hind has also used Michael Findlay's list as a starting point and adapted and added to it, especially with biographical details. His is the best and almost only readily available source I know of for information about the Titanic's crew.
3. Walter Lord included as an appendix the passenger section of the White Star Line's final list of lost and saved, dated May 9, 1912 in his A Night To Remember (Henry Holt, 1955). The list was official, but it was full of errors.
4. Lists were also reported in the London Times in the days following the disaster. By April 20, the Times reproduced an official list supplied by the White Star Line. It differs in form and content from the list in A Night To Remember .
5. Colonel Archibald Gracie's The Truth about the Titanic (1913), reissued in 1985 under the title Titanic, A Survivor's Story, was the first published attempt to compile information about who was on which lifeboats. It is incomplete and for the most part ignores steerage passengers.
6. Titanic: A Tragic Destiny features a chronology and other information helpful in putting together the the lifeboat table
7. The Gulf of Maine Aquarium's Grave of the Titanic includes a chart of passengers by sex and class that was useful for comparison. The site wasn't around when I first compiled my statistics.
8. Titanic Inquiry Project provides the official transcripts of the inquiries made by both the British Board of Trade and the United States Senate. Thousands of pages are available and searchable.
9. Jay Henry Mowbray quickly wrote The Sinking of the Titanic and had it published in 1912. He was not a Titanic passenger, but he was able to include many narratives by passengers. I don't know how accurate his accounts are.
10. Titanic Historical Society includes some interesting information, even if it wasn't that helpful when I was compiling demographic information.

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